England Lionesses crash press conference singing ‘it’s coming home’ after historic Euro victory

England’s triumphant Lionesses gatecrashed a post-match press conference, dancing and singing “it’s coming home” after winning the Women’s Euro 2022 final.

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The England Lionesses gatecrash a press conference singing it’s coming home. (Kathryn Batte/Twitter)

 

 

After Chloe Kelly, 24, scored the winning goal in extra time, the Lionesses secured their first major football trophy, and England’s first since winning the World Cup in 1966.

The England women’s team was brought to a 2 – 1 victory with goals from Kelly and Ella Toone, 22.

Coach Sarina Wiegman was giving a press conference after the match when the team came streaming in, chanting the Euro 96 anthem “Three Lions”.

Kathryn Batte, football correspondent for Mail Sport, posted a video on Twitter of the team dancing into the press conference, with keeper Mary Earps, 29, even standing on the table to pump her fist in the air.

Wiegman seemed delighted by the intrusion, smiling and helping Earps as she climbed onto the desk.

“England players gatecrash Sarina Wiegman’s press conference singing It’s Coming Home,” Batte said with several crying laughing emojis.

The Lionesses came to their first tournament final since 2009 after beating Olympic finalists  Sweden 4 – 0, with their win over Germany marking the first major tournament victory for England since the men’s team won the 1966 World Cup.

The England Women’s team’s win sparked joy across the country, with several of the 7,000 supporters gathered at Trafalgar Square even jumping into the fountain once the final whistle was blown.

The players themselves were in high spirits after smashing the final, with Kelly grabbing the reporter’s mic during a post-match interview to belt out “Sweet Caroline”.

As well as the historic win, there was even more to celebrate with a record crowd for a European Championship final, 87,192, coming to Wembley to support the Lionesses.

The previous attendance record for a Euro’s match was set in 1964, when 79,115 spectators watched the Spanish men’s team play the Soviet Union at the Bernabeu in Madrid.

The numbers also topped the 80,203 people that watched the 2012 Olympic gold-medal football match, in which the United States beat Japan.

As well as taking England to victory, the team also represents a win for LGBTQ+ inclusion in sport, with top-goal scorers like Beth Mead, Fran Kirby and veteran Demi Stokes identifying as part of the queer community.

 

 

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